Invisible Ink

By Carl Veno

Invisible InkInvisible Ink : Carl Veno’s book, Invisible Ink, provides an insider’s view of the newspaper world during the author’s 25-years as a journalist and editor – at a time when major events were having dramatic affects on American society. Told in a no-nonsense matter-of-fact manner, the tales of experience are intermingled with the author’s family history, including the immigration of his Italian ancestors to America more than 125 years ago. Reminiscent moments clearly reveal Carl’s fond memories of growing up and his youthful love of New York.

Various newspaper readership “wars” were destroying and absorbing each other during an incredible age of change and discovery for the American people. Exciting and newsworthy issues including men and women learning to co-exist in the workplace, mobsters, racism, riots, war and space travel were fighting for newspaper space. Between all this the author reveals inner office politics within the industry. We all know from our own experience, differences occur at places of employment – management issues, co-worker competition, etc. – and it is all here. Yet on top of this the reader is introduced to interesting and eccentric characters, complicated work-related relationships and office love affairs. The epilogue closes nicely with the fate of some of the newspapers mentioned in the book.

Prior to entering the world of journalism, Carl spent time as a barber, boxer and army trooper. Not including his free-lance work and lecturing, Veno was employed by eight newspapers (some of which won many awards) and was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize during his career. Carl is now retired and able to pursue his love of exercise through jogging and continues to write books.

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King Bartholomew And The Jester’s Riddle

By Pina Mastromonaco

King BartholomewKing Bartholomew And The Jester’s Riddle : King Bartholomew and the Jester’s Riddle by Pina Mastromonaco is a wonderful, fun book with a humor level perfect for children aged four to eight. Entertaining riddles entice readers to try to guess the answer while enjoying the tale.

Childlike King Bartholomew is obsessed with toys and solving riddles. The chubby, balding King learns to balance play and work time so that he can take responsible care of his land and citizens, yet still enjoy a playful life. The moral-of-the-story is not laid on thick – it is lightly applied so it will be easily accepted by young children. Teachers, librarians and caretakers will enjoy reading this pleasant book to children who like to play rather than accomplish chores or school assignments.

The illustrator, David Martin, is extremely accomplished and very gifted. Each page is filled with incredible detail that reveals more the longer one gazes at them. Many illustrations some form of nature included from the fantastically sculpted bushes, an array of birds and a maze of hedges with a big ‘B’ in the center (B – for King Bartholomew). Richly colored clothes and hilarious costumes for the jester and the King’s servants prove to add an interesting twist to this fun-loving book.”

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